Karl Mather: “I always start from the end. I need to know where I’m going before I start writing. Even if the way you get there changes, I think the best stories always have a good ending. The important thing is to never give up. If you have a story worth telling, you have a reason to keep writing.

 

By Marco Crispano

Tell us about your creative process. How do you create?

I write in windows of opportunity between the day job and shopping for groceries. Like most writers you’re always juggling the dream with the reality of paying the bills.
I always start at the end. I need to know where I am going before I start the actual two fingered typing. Even if the way you get there changes, I think the best stories always have a good ending.
The main thing is never give up. If you’ve got a story worth telling, you’ve got a reason to keep writing.

 

Do you only write screenplays?

I’ve written a couple of TV pilots and I’m working on a stage play at the moment. But mainly screenplays – I love film.

 

What brought you to write this historical, genre script?

I’ve always been interested in history and whether we learn from our mistakes or just keep finding new ways to repeat them.

 

What do you think this kind of story can communicate to contemporary people?

For me, this is a story of connection to the land and of belonging. I’d like to think it would inspire people to stop for a moment and think about those issues from a different point of view.

 

What inspired the writing of the characters?

Standing on a lookout in the Outback and realising just how unfamiliar the landscape is to anyone not brought up there.

 

What are your long-term goals?

Turn those windows of opportunity into the day job.

THE SCREENWRITER

Name: Karl Mather
Screenplay: Featherfoot man

From: Australia